3 Players to watch

 

Wide Receiver – Paul Richardson

This is an area where you will a lot of competition. Expect to see limited, if any, reps out of Baldwin, Kearse, and Lockett. Richardson is intriguing here. He’s a former second round pick who was looking really good before a knee injury knocked him out of the lineup for basically he last two years. He’s a speed threat, and reports from camp are he’s running really well. This is an area where you will a lot of competition. Expect to see limited, if any, reps out of Baldwin, Kearse, and Lockett. Richardson is intriguing here. He’s a former second round pick who was looking really good before a knee injury knocked him out of the lineup for basically he last two years. He’s a speed threat, and reports from camp are he’s running really well. You could make the case Lockett may never have been drafted if not for the injury to Richardson. What for years has been a position panned by pundits may be on the verge of being one of the strongest groups in the league.

 

Defensive Line – Frank Clark

Frank Clark was a disruptive force as a rookie in 2015. In limited snaps he managed 3 sacks, 15 tackles, and was a frequent unwelcome guest in opponents backfields. His player time will increase quite a bit, and he should get a decent amount of playing time in the preseason. He’s dropped some weight to get faster, and will be looking to make an impact on passing downs. How much he will play on obvious rushing downs, and how effective he will be at his new weight, remain to be seen. Clark could very well be the next great defensive player developed by the Seahawks. This will be the first chance to see how much he improves after his first full offseason as a pro.

 

Quarterback – Trevone Boykin

I’ve written about Trevone Boykin before. The Tarvaris Jackson ship has sailed. While he hasn’t explicitly said it, one can strongly infer that Pete Carroll would like for rookie Trevone Boykin to win the job. Boykin has very similar traits to Russell Wilson. Both have strong, accurate arms. Both are fast runners, willing to scramble. And both operate well outside the X’s and O’s, improvising on broken plays with a lot of success. That said, Boykin is still a rookie. He hasn’t played a single live snap. While all reports indicate he’s been solid at training camp, he’s been unable to separate from fellow backup Jake Heaps. Boykin must have a strong preseason to earn enough trust from the team to serve as the number two quarterback, Pete Carroll has the door open to adding a veteran. If Boykin can have a preseason similar to Russell Wilson’s rookie year, those conversations will end.

 

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